MIKE RUGGERI’S ANCIENT AMERICAS LECTURES AND CONFERENCES

(DUE TO THE CANCELLATIONS OF ALL LIVE EVENTS IN THIS LOCKDOWN PERIOD, I HAVE GATHERED A LIST OF SEPTEMBER EVENTS ON ZOOM BELOW.
AND BELOW THOSE ARE A COLLECTION OF ONLINE ANCIENT AMERICAS LECTURES, INCLUDING ONES YOU MAY HAVE MISSED ON ZOOM

September 23, 5:00 pm CDT

The Archaeological Conservancy Presentation

“The Wapello Preserve and the Dynamic History of Native American People in the Upper Midwest”

Philip G. Millhouse, Midwest Regional Director of The Archaeological Conservancy

The Wapello Preserve in northwestern Illinois contains a series of Late Woodland-Mississippian habitation and mound sites along 175 acres of the Apple River. These sites represent many millennia of Indigenous history over countless generations. Two of the most significant sites in area are the John and Grace Chapman sites – a complex of habitation areas, ritual precincts, burial mounds, and earthen platforms dating to around 1000-1200 A.D. In this upcoming lecture, Midwestern Regional Director, Philip Millhouse, will discuss the story of the acquisition and preservation of these significant sites as well as the collaborative effort between The Archaeological Conservancy and the Jo Daviess Conservation Foundation.

Philip Millhouse is The Archaeological Conservancy’s new Midwest Regional Director. He grew up in the rugged hills of northwestern Illinois where his family lived for over a century reveling in the landscape, telling stories, recording vanishing cultural landmarks, and participating in the contentious local preservation battles of the times. Philip attributes his interest in local archaeology to this heritage, which he cites as inspiration for his participation in archaeological surveys and excavations throughout high school, as well as his undergraduate studies at Beloit College. This trajectory continued into his graduate work at the University of Illinois and dissertation work at the Mississippian John Chapman site near his hometown. Philip has been working at the Chapman Sites for over a decade, working with Indigenous communities and the JDCF to preserve and restores sites across 1,000 acres. He has also been involved in the preservation and restoration of several significant archaeological sites across the Midwest.

This lecture series is sponsored by The Archaeological Conservancy. It is free to members of the Conservancy and the general public.

September 23, 2:00 PM MT

School for Advanced Research Zoom Lecture

“Coming Together: Pueblo History in the Pojoaque Area”

Scott Ortman is Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, and SAR’s 2020 Weatherhead fellow.

For the past six years, Ortman has had the honor to partner with the Pueblo of Pojoaque in a joint investigation of ancestral sites in the Pojoaque area. Through this partnership, Ortman learned important lessons regarding the potential of archaeology for tribal communities; how archaeologists and tribal members can work together as co-investigators; how such partnerships improve and decolonize archaeological practice; and how the incorporation of traditional knowledge leads to better archaeology in both its humanistic and social scientific dimensions. In the process, Ortman also had the opportunity to engage with Native philosophy and to understand the issues facing the Pojoaque and other Native communities today. In this talk, he explores a key tension emerging from these experiences and discusses some of its counter-intuitive implications for archaeological practice. He illustrates these points using results from work at K’uuyemugeh and other ancestral sites in the Pojoaque area.

Register for this talk here and see the full series here.
https://sarweb.org/calendar/action~agenda/request_format~json/cat_ids~24/

September 28; 2:00 PM ET

Adelphi University Online Lecture

“A Mammoth Discovery: Ice Age Archaeology of Alaska”

Registration here;
https://adelphiuniversity.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUod-iopj4qHdcRa2pLn0u9UPxWKP1BsaHm?_x_zm_rtaid=36YrDkYiQWexDikQvy14IA.1598467125978.297543e429896d9e921931ad0247b0c5&_x_zm_rhtaid=843


A COLLECTION OF ONLINE ANCIENT AMERICAS LECTURES, INCLUDING ONES YOU MAY HAVE MISSED ON ZOOM

Boundary End Archaeology Research Center

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_So5zb_7uB7WA17xGu0SWw

Arizona State Museum

https://www.youtube.com/user/azstatemuseum/videos

Live Lectures – Archaeology Southwest

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLWFcE1BwwauH8A5Iv14sizGk4p_JUhOs

Archaeology Southwest Complete You Tube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/user/ArchaeologySouthwest/videos

Verde Valley Archaeology Center

https://www.verdevalleyarchaeology.org/lectures

Taos Archaeology Society

https://taosarch.wildapricot.org/SpeakerVideos

Crow Canyon Archaeology Center

https://www.youtube.com/user/CrowCanyonConnects/videos

School for Advanced Research

https://www.youtube.com/user/sarsantafemultimedia/videos

Amerind Museum

https://www.amerind.org/events/

Archaeology Southwest Video Archive

https://www.archaeologysouthwest.org/videos/

Four Corners Lecture Series

https://crowcanyon.org/index.php/learn-about-archaeology/archaeology-webinars

Stephen Lekson Archaeology Channel

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=steven+lekson

Paul Minnis Archaeology Channel

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=paul+minnis+archaeology

David Stuart

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAAWt1kMbmMFfEVMobgCsYw/videos

Mark Van Stone

https://www.youtube.com/user/markvanstone2012/videos

Southwest Seminars (A lending library of videos with a huge collection of Ancient Americas speakers and videos for rent.)

https://southwestseminars.tv/catalog

Timothy Pauketat

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=timothy+pauketat

Illinois State Archaeology Survey

https://www.youtube.com/user/illinoisarchaeology

Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=+The+Arizona+Archaeological+%26+Historical+Society

Princeton Art Museum

“Xochipala; Salvaging a Looted Culture and its Art”

Leveraging new scientific analyses, available (but limited) archaeological data, and unique historical records held at Princeton, this lecture provides a fresh consideration of the art style known as Xochipala. This material was looted from the region around a modern village of the same name in Guerrero, Mexico, beginning in the nineteenth century but with heightened intensity in the 1960s and later. The looting irreparably destroyed the objects’ original contexts, resulting in decades of speculative and imaginative interpretation. Bryan Just, Peter Jay Sharp Curator and Lecturer in the Art of the Ancient Americas, will provide new insights and a frank assessment of what has been lost through clandestine pillaging.

https://artmuseum.princeton.edu/video/xochipala-salvaging-looted-culture-and-its-art

Archaeological Conservancy

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSCkTqtJ134DFc9rcfZMY9w/videos

ANCIENT AMERICAS SPECIAL MUSEUM EXHIBITS

December 16, 2019-January 10, 2021

Met Museum NYC Exhibit

“Arte del mar: Artistic Exchange in the Caribbean”

Arte del mar (“art of/from the sea”) explores the artistic exchange around the rim of the Caribbean Sea before the sixteenth century between the Taíno civilizations of the Antilles archipelago and their powerful peers on the continental mainland. Recent archaeological, ethnohistorical, and art-historical research has deepened our understanding of indigenous Caribbean concepts of ritual knowledge, ceremonial performance, and political power. Artists in the region—which includes the modern Antilles archipelago and countries such as Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica, and Honduras—sought to express the distinct force of their deities and ancestors, known to the Taínos as zemí (or cemí), which pervaded the environment and was crucial to the foundation of communities. Pendants and other objects worn and used by leaders in ceremonies were created from imported luxury materials and share a formal grammar that is inextricably linked with deeply rooted mythological narratives. Works of art on view in the exhibition, largely drawn from The Met collection, celebrate the region’s ancestral traditio